Egyptian talismans used in medicine

Egyptian talismans used in medicine
Egyptian talismans (ornamental charms) were worn by both the living and the dead. Some protected the wearer against specific dangers and others endowed him or her with special characteristics, such as strength or fierceness.

Talismans were often in the shape of animals, plants, sacred objects, or hieroglyphic symbols. The combination of shape, color and material were important to the effectiveness of an talisman.

Continue reading “Egyptian talismans used in medicine”

Egyptian talismans

Egyptian talismans Here are some talismans, which were often used as jewelry in ancient Egypt.
The first is the Wedjat eye of Horus, sometimes called the eye of Ra. It was Horus’ healed eye.
The second is the ankh which meant life or to live. It was originally a sandal strap, the round part going around the ankle. The two words “sandal strap” and “life” sounded the same, so the sandal strap came to represent life, by what is known in linguistics as the “rebus principle.”
The Djed pillar or column represented stability.
Kheper (or khepper) was a scarab beetle, and was associated with creation or rebirth, because large quantities of these beetles seem to be born from nothing right out of the ground and from balls of dung. Words and names were often inscribed on metallic scarabs.
Nowadays, the cartouche (a loop or two of rope) is a popular piece of jewelry, usually containing a person’s name. In ancient times, only the king (or queen or sometimes high priest) had his name in a cartouche. Other people just had their names spelled out, with perhaps a sign to indicate that the name was that of a man or woman.
The Tyet talismans was apparently associated with life and welfare.