THE HAND

Hand of SabaziusThe use of a representation of the Hand as a talisman can be traced back to at least 800 years B.C., when it was used as a charm against enchantment. Many varieties of the Hand exist; in some the elaboration is very marked, each device representing some particular charm.
Life size models of these Hands were supposed to guard the house against all influences of magic and evil, and smaller replicas protected their wearers from every description of harm.
The extended thumb and first two fingers, the third and fourth fingers closed, is a position still assumed during the Benediction in some Christian Churches to-day.

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talismans used in ancient Egypt

The larger part of the talismans used in ancient Egypt represented some living creature. The most usual type is the bull’s head, which was cut from carnelian, hematite, amazon stone, lapis lazuli, or quartz. Prehistoric Egyptian talismans representing the fly have been found; these were of slate, lapis lazuli and serpentine. In historic times gold was employed as the material. Other types occurring in pre-historic times are the hawk, of quartz or limestone; the serpent, of lapis lazuli or limestone; the crocodile and the frog.
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Famous Thai talismans – CHUCHOK

CHUCHOK - Famous Thai talismansYou can ask for fortune, wealth, a beautiful wife, and unexpected richness from the talisman known as Chuchok’s idol.
Chuchok is thought by many Thais to be one of the very best talismans for bringing wealth and granting wishes. The talisman takes the form of an old beggar named “Chuchok”.

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Egyptian talismans used in medicine

Egyptian talismans used in medicine
Egyptian talismans (ornamental charms) were worn by both the living and the dead. Some protected the wearer against specific dangers and others endowed him or her with special characteristics, such as strength or fierceness.

Talismans were often in the shape of animals, plants, sacred objects, or hieroglyphic symbols. The combination of shape, color and material were important to the effectiveness of an talisman.

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Egyptian talismans

Egyptian talismans Here are some talismans, which were often used as jewelry in ancient Egypt.
The first is the Wedjat eye of Horus, sometimes called the eye of Ra. It was Horus’ healed eye.
The second is the ankh which meant life or to live. It was originally a sandal strap, the round part going around the ankle. The two words “sandal strap” and “life” sounded the same, so the sandal strap came to represent life, by what is known in linguistics as the “rebus principle.”
The Djed pillar or column represented stability.
Kheper (or khepper) was a scarab beetle, and was associated with creation or rebirth, because large quantities of these beetles seem to be born from nothing right out of the ground and from balls of dung. Words and names were often inscribed on metallic scarabs.
Nowadays, the cartouche (a loop or two of rope) is a popular piece of jewelry, usually containing a person’s name. In ancient times, only the king (or queen or sometimes high priest) had his name in a cartouche. Other people just had their names spelled out, with perhaps a sign to indicate that the name was that of a man or woman.
The Tyet talismans was apparently associated with life and welfare.