African talisman – general facts

african talismansThe talismans of the Akan people in Ghana are called bansuri. The Hausa and Yoruba people of Nigeria make tira, Afro Brazilians make patua, Bakongo peoples in the Congo make minkisi, and African Americans in the United States call their amulets mojo. The physical manifestation of prayers and talismans is ubiquitous and connects to other cultural traditions as well- doaa nameh in Iran, scapulars for Catholics, and mezuzahs in the Jewish tradition.

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Famous Thai talismans – CHUCHOK

CHUCHOK - Famous Thai talismansYou can ask for fortune, wealth, a beautiful wife, and unexpected richness from the talisman known as Chuchok’s idol.
Chuchok is thought by many Thais to be one of the very best talismans for bringing wealth and granting wishes. The talisman takes the form of an old beggar named “Chuchok”.

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Egyptian talismans used in medicine

Egyptian talismans used in medicine
Egyptian talismans (ornamental charms) were worn by both the living and the dead. Some protected the wearer against specific dangers and others endowed him or her with special characteristics, such as strength or fierceness.

Talismans were often in the shape of animals, plants, sacred objects, or hieroglyphic symbols. The combination of shape, color and material were important to the effectiveness of an talisman.

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Egyptian talismans

Egyptian talismans Here are some talismans, which were often used as jewelry in ancient Egypt.
The first is the Wedjat eye of Horus, sometimes called the eye of Ra. It was Horus’ healed eye.
The second is the ankh which meant life or to live. It was originally a sandal strap, the round part going around the ankle. The two words “sandal strap” and “life” sounded the same, so the sandal strap came to represent life, by what is known in linguistics as the “rebus principle.”
The Djed pillar or column represented stability.
Kheper (or khepper) was a scarab beetle, and was associated with creation or rebirth, because large quantities of these beetles seem to be born from nothing right out of the ground and from balls of dung. Words and names were often inscribed on metallic scarabs.
Nowadays, the cartouche (a loop or two of rope) is a popular piece of jewelry, usually containing a person’s name. In ancient times, only the king (or queen or sometimes high priest) had his name in a cartouche. Other people just had their names spelled out, with perhaps a sign to indicate that the name was that of a man or woman.
The Tyet talismans was apparently associated with life and welfare.

Seal of Solomon

In Medieval Jewish, Islamic and Christian legends, the Seal of Solomon was a magical signet ring said to have been possessed by King Solomon, which variously gave him the power to command demons (or jinni), or to speak with animals. In one of the Arabian Nights’ Entertainments, an evil djinn is described as being imprisoned in a copper bottle for 1,800 years by a lead seal stamped by the ring. Other, later books (Pseudomonarchia Daemonum) manage to fit far more demons in the bottle.

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